Members tagged “dance scholar”

Amy Bowring

Amy Bowring holds an Honours B.A. in Fine Arts Studies from York University and an M.A. in Journalism from the University of Western Ontario. She is the Director of Collections and Research at Dance Collection Danse where she was mentored by founders Lawrence and Miriam Adams, and has been involved with the organization in various capacities since 1993. Amy is one of Canada’s foremost advocates for the study and preservation of Canadian dance heritage.

A freelance dance writer and historian, she is also the founder of the Canadian Society for Dance Studies. She has written historical essays and articles for books and magazines including the Canadian Encyclopedia, International Dictionary of Modern Dance, Right to Dance: Dancing for Rights and The Dance Current, where she was also the copy editor for 13 years. She has curated virtual exhibitions on dance artists Nancy Lima Dent and Alison Sutcliffe and curated several live exhibitions including Dancing Through Time: Toronto’s Dance History, 1900-1980 and Canada’s Pre-eminent Showman: The Artistry of Alan Lund. She guest lectures widely and teaches dance history at Ryerson University.

Amy is a co-recipient of the 2002 Toronto Emerging Dance Artist Award for her work as a dance writer. She was a board member for Dance Media Group, sat on the founding board of the Canadian Dance Assembly and has served as a member of the Discipline Advisory Committee for Dance at the Canada Council for the Arts. She is currently on the Advisory Board of the international journal Dance Chronicle and in 2015 testified before the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage regarding the power of dance to reflect Canadian stories.

Though an Ontario native, Amy’s maternal and paternal ancestors have been in Newfoundland for more than two centuries. In 2015, Amy edited Down to Bowring’s: A Memoir by Derrick Bowring, her grandfather, published by Creative Book Publishers.

Photo Credit: Jeremy Mimnagh.

Andrew Draskoy

Andrew Draskóy has been active as a choreographer, dancer, and historical dance researcher and teacher since 1988. His choreographic works include Brigamania 135 (1996), The Pull (1997), Transformation Motif (2004), Every Day (2006), Impetus (2009) and numerous collaborative works.

In the choreographers' collective Louder than Words (1994-2000) he discovered a love of collaborative choreography and structured improvisation. He continues to work in this form with other independent choreographers and contemporary dancers in St. John's.

Andrew's work in Renaissance dance research and reconstruction has been presented around the world, including at the International Early Dance Conference in Belgium (2000) and the Boston Early Music Festival (2003). His paper "`Se il Cavallo Gagliardo': Connections between Horsemanship and Dance in 16th Century Italy" has been cited in major works in the field. He taught Renaissance dance in St. John's from 1989 to 1997, and continues to teach occasional workshops locally and abroad, including annually at the NL Folk Festival. In 1997 he and Alison Carter produced a large Renaissance Dance show for Year of the Arts.
He has choreographed in period style for six theatrical productions in St. John's.

In 2009 Andrew formed a new company to work specifically on Renaissance dance. This group of eight performers presented work and conducted several workshops in 2010 as part of the Quidi Vidi dance series, the Newfoundland and Labrador Folk Festival, Culture Days, and the Cupids 400' Muses and Minstrels Festival. The company is currently working on reviving a Spanish dance form that was a precursor to Flamenco, and preparing for the 2011 touring season.

Andrew is also involved in preserving and sharing traditional Newfoundland dance.

Kristin Harris Walsh

Kristin Harris Walsh is a dance scholar and writer (PhD Folklore, Memorial and MA Dance, York) with training in step dance (Irish and Newfoundland) and ballet. She has written and presented extensively on dance topics in both academic and popular publications, primarily related to vernacular dance as a means of cultural expression and negotiation. She is currently lead investigator on a SSHRC-funded research project on percussive dance in Canada, looking specifically at the links between traditional NL step dance and Irish sean-nós step dance. Kristin is the Past President of DanceNL and the President of the Canadian Society for Dance Studies/La société canadienne d’études en danse.

Candice Pike

Candice Pike is a dance practitioner, teacher, researcher, and advocate based in Corner Brook, Newfoundland. She is currently the Festival Manager for Gros Morne Summer Music.

Candice has taught ballet, jazz, modern dance, and dance fitness for nine years in Corner Brook, NL and Toronto, ON and is independently pursuing a community-based dance research project. Passionate about fostering an appreciation for dance in young people, she recently redesigned Grenfell Campus' children's dance camps to include performance training, somatic education, and movement exploration as well as formal technique training. Also, she is involved in Learning Through the Arts in the Western School District where she teaches math and social studies to grade three students through dance.

Candice has MA in Dance from York University. Her studies there focused on the intersections of recreational ballet, gender, and community building through feminist research and she is excited to explore these ideas in rural Newfoundland.